Maria, family member of an EU citizen

Maria is not a citizen of an EU/EEA country. She is married to Cristiano who is an Italian citizen. Cristiano and Maria have moved to Sweden as Cristiano has a job there. Maria wishes to study some international courses at a university in Sweden and is wondering if she would be required to pay fees.

Pernilla, admissions counselor

Pernilla Andersson works at University Admissions in Sweden as an admissions officer. She is here to answer some questions that our international applicants have regarding application and tuition fees in Sweden.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Maria: What is my husband's status in Sweden? 

Pernilla: Cristiano has citizenship in an EU/EEA country and therefore has right of residence in Sweden. This means that he is allowed to be in Sweden for longer than 3 months without needing a residency permit.  

Maria: I have read something about being a family member of an EU/EEA citizen with right of residence in Sweden. Does this mean I don´t have to pay application and tuition fees?  

Pernilla: You can be considered a family member if you are a spouse, registered partner or common-law spouse; a child under 21 years of age who is financially dependent on their parent(s); or a parent who is financially dependent on their child who lives in Sweden.

Because you are married to Cristiano and he has right of residence in Sweden, this also gives you right of residence in Sweden and, as such, you are not required to pay application or tuition fees. 

There are a number of ways for a European citizen to gain right of residence in Sweden. In your case, it's because Cristiano has a job in Sweden. The Swedish Migration Agency has more information on how a European citizen can get right of residence in Sweden, please see the following link:

Right of residence information

It's important to point out that Swedish citizens are not considered EU/EEA citizens in this context. Swedish citizens should contact the Swedish Migration Agency (Migrationsverket) if they have questions.  

Maria: Do I need to send in any type of documentation?  

Pernilla: Please submit a copy of your "Residence card of a family member of a union citizen" (Uppehållskort) that you received from the Swedish Migration Agency (Migrationsverket). If you have been granted a Residence card (Uppehållskort), but have not yet received your card, please send a copy of the letter you received from the Swedish Migration Agency (Migrationsverket) regarding this decision.

You must also verify Cristiano's citizenship status by submitting a copy of his passport or an ID card where it states clearly what his country of citizenship is. The instructions for how to do that can be found on this page: EU/EEA citizens documentation requirements

If you haven't yet received your "Uppehållskort", there are two types of documentation we need:

  • documentation of your relationship with Cristiano. In your case, this could be a copy of your marriage license. There are other ways of documenting a relationship. You can read more at this following link: Documenting relationship status

  • documentation of why Cristiano was granted right of residence. In your case, this would be a copy of his employment contract in Sweden. There are other ways of being granted right of residence and documenting this. Please see the Swedish Migration Agency's website for more specific information: Documenting your right of residence reason

I strongly suggest you consult The Swedish Migration Agency´s website for more information on right of residence and what is required at the links above.

 

Illustrations by Gabriel Wentz